OGIO Nexos

SCORE
85
GRADE
B
Club Storage
87
Legs
87
Straps
90
Pockets/Storage
95
Rain Hood
85
Carrying Impressions
80
Style
81
Innovation
96
Cost/Value
81

OGIO basically throws everything (including the kitchen sink) into the Nexos bag. The good news is that some of the innovations are great. The bad news is that others still need a little bit of work. Oh, and the OGIO Nexos is the heaviest and most expensive bag we tested. So if you like gadgets, usually take a cart, and are price-insensitive, then this may be the bag for you. Frequent walkers who lost their 401(k) in the stock crash might want to turn their attention elsewhere.

Retail price: $260

Availability: Discontinued; replaced by the OGIO Edge Stand Bag


87 / B+

Club Storage
A 10-way top splits the club storage area of the OGIO Nexos into, you guessed it, 10 sectors. Dividers that run the full-length of the bag partion off each of the sections. According to OGIO’s marketing literature, some of the sectors are slightly raised – “think of it as stadium seating for your woods” – and the system is supposed to help isolate woods, hybrids and wedges from one another. We apparently are not smart enough to figure out which sectors are for which clubs, and even if we were, we’re not sure why our clubs need stadium seating. In any event, there is lots of room for your clubs – whether your wood are banished to the back row of the stadium so as not to obstruct the view of your hybrids and wedges is up to you.


87 / B+

Legs
The OGIO Nexos features the “Arc Lite” leg system – the legs rotate slightly to the side as they are deployed and rotate back in when disengaged – which is supposed to keep them from smacking into your leg as you pick up the bag. Well, it must work, because we didn’t experience any problems with running afoul of the Nexos’ legs when picking up the bag. On the other hand, we hadn’t really noticed that as a burning issue with any of the other bags either. This strikes us as possibly being what some engineers call “a solution looking for a problem.”
The legs extend somewhat independently, which makes deployment on uneven lies a bit easier. We did note that, as with the Ping Hoofer Vantage, it requires an extra “oomph” of exertion on the bag to pop the legs out. Not that you need to start weight training or anything, but it takes a little bit of getting used to.


90 / A-

Straps
The two straps on the OGIO Nexos are integrated as a single unit, and, in a literal show of one-upmanship, are adjustable at FIVE different points, instead of the typical four (the extra adjustment point on the Nexos is the ability to fine tune the width between the straps). Combine this with some nice padding, and you’ve got an excellent strap system.


95 / A

Pockets/Storage
Whoo boy – we don’t even know where to start on the OGIO Nexos’ pockets! The bag features 11 total pockets, 6 of which are zippered.

Our conclusion? The OGIO Nexos is unparalleled for storage. And as much as we mock the labeling of the different pockets and doodads, it’s actually quite useful to know what they’re for.


85 / B

Rain Hood
In principle, the concept of the rain hood for the OGIO Nexos seems great – instead of a zipper for access to the clubs, the rain hood uses spring tension to close what looks like a gigantic clamshell. Installing the hood is supposed to be easy, involving plugging the hood’s two posts into two receptacles on the bag and Velcroing the hood all along the edge of the bag and around the straps. Unfortunately the process isn’t intuitive – it took us some time to realize that the posts must be rotated so that they are inserted in the proper direction. This involves closely examining the post each time – something we don’t think we would want to do when the raindrops start falling quickly. More importantly, we had a problem with the posts occasionally slipping out of the receptacles. Our conclusion is that in swinging for the fences, OGIO ripped one foul into the upper deck. Nice effort, but in the end, just a loud strike.


80 / B-

Carrying Impressions
The downside of all the gadgets and gizmos on the OGIO Nexos is that they add weight. The Nexos is quite a load to carry, and may actually fare better as a cart bag.


81 / B-

Style
The OGIO Nexos has a look that only a mother would love. It’s a bit rotund, and has some funny bulges. It is only available in 3 color combinations:

Oh, and did we mention the plaid lining inside the pockets?


96 / A

Innovation
OGIO earns the highest score in this category as they go farther in trying creative ideas than any other manufacturer. Of course these experiments achieve different levels of success, but kudos to OGIO for putting themselves out there with new features.


81 / B-

Cost/Value
Innovation apparently doesn’t come cheap, because the OGIO Nexos retails for a whopping $260, making it the most expensive bag tested. The price, combined with some of the weaknesses we found in using the Nexos as an every day walking bag, tempered our rating of the bag’s value.